Sunday, March 16, 2014

State takes over RTE admissions from schools

25 PER CENT RESERVATION FOR BPL KIDS
State to set up centres to help parents of students seeking admission to complete online process before their distribution to different schools
Nozia Sayyed
Posted On Tuesday, March 04, 2014 at 10:00:15 AM

File Photo
Last year, parents of students eligible under RTE Act had protested against schools that refused to admit their children
Miffed with the way admissions under the Right To Education (RTE) Act, 2009, were handled by individual schools till 2013, the State’s primary education board has decided to step in and centralise the online RTE admissions from this year on, where admissions will be decided by the State’s education board.

The decision was taken in a meeting held in the city on Monday. Mahaveer Mane, State Director for Primary Education, told Mirror, “The online admissions under RTE Act will be carried out in South Mumbai, PCMC and PMC. The new admissions will be distributed in 463 private unaided schools.

The URL for the website will be declared in the next two days.” The Pune Municipal Corporation’s school board has decided to set up 15 guidance centres across the city — managed by the Maharashtra Knowledge Corporation Limited (MKCL) — to help students and parents belonging to Below Poverty Line (BPL) fill the online admission forms.

“The centres will have computers and trained staff to counsel parents,” said Ravindra Chaudhry, PMC school board chairman. When asked about the move, Dhananjay Pardeshi, Deputy Education Officer said, “We will be having online admissions from this week onwards.

The state will have full authority over admissions and private unaided schools will not have a say in it. We are aiming at admitting almost 5,000 students under the RTE Act. There are 215 private unaided schools that will come under these admissions and the process of filling the information about these schools is on.

Next week, we will declare the website open where the parents can fill forms. As of now, we are in the process of streamlining information – including the school website, numbers and staff members’ contact details for the records. Last year, there were 1,500 students that benefited under the RTE Act.

This year, the students will get reimbursements from the government for last year where they had to pay for their admissions.” The State’s decision has come as a relief to schools that had to conduct a separate admission process required to fill the 25 per cent seats reserved for BPL students.

However, much to the annoyance of school managements, this year also they have been asked to wait till May. Talking about the Act, Milind Ladge, managing director of Aaryan School, Katraj, said, “The reservation quota is a headache. Last year, we had admitted students belonging to the BPL category.

However, the government is yet to pay us Rs 16,400 for last year’s admissions. This year too they will dupe us.” “It is not feasible for us to let down parents who are ultimately our customers.

There was no meeting called by the Board where private schools were invited and we were not informed on how the admissions were going to take place for this academic year. In our school we started the admissions from December last year and so far 880 new students have been admitted,” he added.

Father Mario Fernandes, Principal of the Loyola School for Boys, Pashan, said, “It is ultimately our school, our property and we should be involved in choosing the students. Every school has a ranking and admissions are carried out accordingly.

If the government decides on the 25 per cent admissions in the private sector, then it leaves us with only 75 per cent authority and power on our own school, which is ridiculous.

For our school too the government is yet to pay for last year’s RTE admissions.” “We have already started admitting students for the current academic year.

The government has delayed its decision on admissions which will hamper our academics and we cannot take a chance where we have to complete the syllabus in haste,” he added.

On the other hand, a spokesperson from Jyortimayee School, ICCSE, Wagholi said, “We follow RTE and the government orders and we are waiting for new students who will be enrolled by the government.

We have not yet begun with the admissions in our school and we don’t have a problem with government deciding on who should be taught at our school.”

Taking cognisance of the schools’ complaints of lack of compensation for RTE admissions, the Aurangabad Bench of Bombay High Court recently issued an order that if the government fails to reimburse the admission concessions, pre-primary schools can revert to earlier admission practices. Whether city schools will wait for the funds and skip RTE admissions for now remains to be seen.



►  Online admissions will be done in South Mumbai, PCMC and PMC, with children being distributed in 463 private unaided schools

- Mahaveer Mane, State Director for Primary Education
Low cost private schools may solve India’s problem by F wire Mar 14, 2014 #Ajax #Business #Chrome #Cinema #Crime #Education #Elections #Firefox #India #NewsTracker #Religion inShare 0 CommentsEmailPrint New Delhi, March 13 (IANS) Low cost private schools may provide education to all children, educationist James Tooley said Thursday, adding that attention is not being given to such schools. Recounting his experience in Hyderabad, Tooley, a professor of education policy at the Newcastle University in Britain, who has served as a consultant for the World Bank, said he was struck by the ubiquity of private schools in a slum area. "The parents in the slum did not want to send their children to government schools, but they sent them to a low cost private schools," he said. "This is not just the case in India, it is so in the entire developing world," Tooley said participating in a conference on school education organised by industrial body CII. Toby Linden, lead education specialist at the World Bank, stressed that Indian government has not been trying to find new ways to use finance education. "The same pattern has been repeated over years, they are not thinking of creative ways to use finance for the education sector," he said. A recent report by NGO Pratham released earlier this year showed the enrolment level in schools has made significant strides with 97 percent of children now in schools, compared with 93 percent in 2005. However, the quality of learning as measured by reading, writing, and arithmetic, has not shown much improvement as per the report. The study also noted that there has been a steady increase in private school enrolment from 18.7 percent in 2006 to 29 percent in 2013. This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed. ALSO SEE 16 Afghan militants killed in security operations Doctors' strike: Allahabad HC orders probe Michelle Obama honours India's 'Stop Acid Attacks' campaigner RELATED VIDEOS Down but not out: AAP could still play spoiler in Lok Sabha polls Kejriwal's joyride ends with AAP activists damaging metal detectors Amma rings Didi, discuss upcoming Lok Sabha polls RELATED:

Read more at: http://www.firstpost.com/fwire/low-cost-private-schools-may-solve-indias-problem-1433781.html?utm_source=ref_article
Low cost private schools may solve India’s problem by F wire Mar 14, 2014 #Ajax #Business #Chrome #Cinema #Crime #Education #Elections #Firefox #India #NewsTracker #Religion inShare 0 CommentsEmailPrint New Delhi, March 13 (IANS) Low cost private schools may provide education to all children, educationist James Tooley said Thursday, adding that attention is not being given to such schools. Recounting his experience in Hyderabad, Tooley, a professor of education policy at the Newcastle University in Britain, who has served as a consultant for the World Bank, said he was struck by the ubiquity of private schools in a slum area. "The parents in the slum did not want to send their children to government schools, but they sent them to a low cost private schools," he said. "This is not just the case in India, it is so in the entire developing world," Tooley said participating in a conference on school education organised by industrial body CII. Toby Linden, lead education specialist at the World Bank, stressed that Indian government has not been trying to find new ways to use finance education. "The same pattern has been repeated over years, they are not thinking of creative ways to use finance for the education sector," he said. A recent report by NGO Pratham released earlier this year showed the enrolment level in schools has made significant strides with 97 percent of children now in schools, compared with 93 percent in 2005. However, the quality of learning as measured by reading, writing, and arithmetic, has not shown much improvement as per the report. The study also noted that there has been a steady increase in private school enrolment from 18.7 percent in 2006 to 29 percent in 2013.

Read more at: http://www.firstpost.com/fwire/low-cost-private-schools-may-solve-indias-problem-1433781.html?utm_source=ref_article
Low cost private schools may solve India’s problem by F wire Mar 14, 2014 #Ajax #Business #Chrome #Cinema #Crime #Education #Elections #Firefox #India #NewsTracker #Religion inShare 0 CommentsEmailPrint New Delhi, March 13 (IANS) Low cost private schools may provide education to all children, educationist James Tooley said Thursday, adding that attention is not being given to such schools. Recounting his experience in Hyderabad, Tooley, a professor of education policy at the Newcastle University in Britain, who has served as a consultant for the World Bank, said he was struck by the ubiquity of private schools in a slum area. "The parents in the slum did not want to send their children to government schools, but they sent them to a low cost private schools," he said. "This is not just the case in India, it is so in the entire developing world," Tooley said participating in a conference on school education organised by industrial body CII. Toby Linden, lead education specialist at the World Bank, stressed that Indian government has not been trying to find new ways to use finance education. "The same pattern has been repeated over years, they are not thinking of creative ways to use finance for the education sector," he said. A recent report by NGO Pratham released earlier this year showed the enrolment level in schools has made significant strides with 97 percent of children now in schools, compared with 93 percent in 2005. However, the quality of learning as measured by reading, writing, and arithmetic, has not shown much improvement as per the report. The study also noted that there has been a steady increase in private school enrolment from 18.7 percent in 2006 to 29 percent in 2013.

Read more at: http://www.firstpost.com/fwire/low-cost-private-schools-may-solve-indias-problem-1433781.html?utm_source=ref_article
25 PER CENT RESERVATION FOR BPL KIDS

State takes over RTE admissions from schools

State to set up centres to help parents of students seeking admission to complete online process before their distribution to different schools
Nozia Sayyed
Posted On Tuesday, March 04, 2014 at 10:00:15 AM

File Photo
Last year, parents of students eligible under RTE Act had protested against schools that refused to admit their children
Miffed with the way admissions under the Right To Education (RTE) Act, 2009, were handled by individual schools till 2013, the State’s primary education board has decided to step in and centralise the online RTE admissions from this year on, where admissions will be decided by the State’s education board.

The decision was taken in a meeting held in the city on Monday. Mahaveer Mane, State Director for Primary Education, told Mirror, “The online admissions under RTE Act will be carried out in South Mumbai, PCMC and PMC. The new admissions will be distributed in 463 private unaided schools.

The URL for the website will be declared in the next two days.” The Pune Municipal Corporation’s school board has decided to set up 15 guidance centres across the city — managed by the Maharashtra Knowledge Corporation Limited (MKCL) — to help students and parents belonging to Below Poverty Line (BPL) fill the online admission forms.

“The centres will have computers and trained staff to counsel parents,” said Ravindra Chaudhry, PMC school board chairman. When asked about the move, Dhananjay Pardeshi, Deputy Education Officer said, “We will be having online admissions from this week onwards.

The state will have full authority over admissions and private unaided schools will not have a say in it. We are aiming at admitting almost 5,000 students under the RTE Act. There are 215 private unaided schools that will come under these admissions and the process of filling the information about these schools is on.

Next week, we will declare the website open where the parents can fill forms. As of now, we are in the process of streamlining information – including the school website, numbers and staff members’ contact details for the records. Last year, there were 1,500 students that benefited under the RTE Act.

This year, the students will get reimbursements from the government for last year where they had to pay for their admissions.” The State’s decision has come as a relief to schools that had to conduct a separate admission process required to fill the 25 per cent seats reserved for BPL students.

However, much to the annoyance of school managements, this year also they have been asked to wait till May. Talking about the Act, Milind Ladge, managing director of Aaryan School, Katraj, said, “The reservation quota is a headache. Last year, we had admitted students belonging to the BPL category.

However, the government is yet to pay us Rs 16,400 for last year’s admissions. This year too they will dupe us.” “It is not feasible for us to let down parents who are ultimately our customers.

There was no meeting called by the Board where private schools were invited and we were not informed on how the admissions were going to take place for this academic year. In our school we started the admissions from December last year and so far 880 new students have been admitted,” he added.

Father Mario Fernandes, Principal of the Loyola School for Boys, Pashan, said, “It is ultimately our school, our property and we should be involved in choosing the students. Every school has a ranking and admissions are carried out accordingly.

If the government decides on the 25 per cent admissions in the private sector, then it leaves us with only 75 per cent authority and power on our own school, which is ridiculous.

For our school too the government is yet to pay for last year’s RTE admissions.” “We have already started admitting students for the current academic year.

The government has delayed its decision on admissions which will hamper our academics and we cannot take a chance where we have to complete the syllabus in haste,” he added.

On the other hand, a spokesperson from Jyortimayee School, ICCSE, Wagholi said, “We follow RTE and the government orders and we are waiting for new students who will be enrolled by the government.

We have not yet begun with the admissions in our school and we don’t have a problem with government deciding on who should be taught at our school.”

Taking cognisance of the schools’ complaints of lack of compensation for RTE admissions, the Aurangabad Bench of Bombay High Court recently issued an order that if the government fails to reimburse the admission concessions, pre-primary schools can revert to earlier admission practices. Whether city schools will wait for the funds and skip RTE admissions for now remains to be seen.



►  Online admissions will be done in South Mumbai, PCMC and PMC, with children being distributed in 463 private unaided schools

- Mahaveer Mane, State Director for Primary Education

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