To ‘improve learning’, Delhi govt to scrap no detention policy after RTE amendment

To ‘improve learning’, Delhi govt to scrap no detention policy after RTE amendment

The government justified the stand, stating that no detention policy leads to children being promoted without learning, and that scrapping the policy would lead to improved learning levels.

Written by Shradha Chettri | New Delhi | Updated: July 20, 2018 3:21:06 am
According to a source, the government will work to bring back detention from the next academic session, and consult parents and teachers on the same.
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According to a source, the government will work to bring back detention from the next academic session, and consult parents and teachers on the same.
With the Lok Sabha passing the amendment to the Right to Education Act (2009), the Delhi government has decided to do away with the “No Detention Policy”. With the amendment, states can scrap the policy wherein children, from classes III to VIII, were not detained even if they failed the examination.
“It is yet to be passed in the Rajya Sabha, so we are waiting for it. Once it is passed, we will be working to bring back detention,” said Atishi Marlena, former advisor to Education Minister Manish Sisodia.
From the very beginning, when the proposal for the amendment was moved by the Ministry of Human Resource and Development (MHRD), Sisodia has voiced support to scrap the policy.
The government justified the stand, stating that no detention policy leads to children being promoted without learning, and that scrapping the policy would lead to improved learning levels.
According to a source, the government will work to bring back detention from the next academic session, and consult parents and teachers on the same.
Sisodia has also been in favour of scrapping the policy as he received complaints from teachers about its negative impact on learning, said the source.
“It’s a good thing that the amendment to the RTE Act has been passed. As children could not be detained, parents and children did not take the process seriously, thinking they will be promoted anyway. Now, the process is going to get better,” said Sapna Singh, a government school teacher.
However, experts argued against the removal of the policy, claiming that it would lead to an increase in the number of dropouts.
“It is the poor quality of education, lack of infrastructure, teacher vacancies and the presence of untrained teachers that may have an effect on learning outcomes. The no detention clause, one of the most critical parts of the RTE Act that has been pulled out, has put the entire RTE Act at risk of disintegration. The greatest negative impact will be on disadvantaged groups, first generation learners and Adivasi students, as well as girls,” said Ambarish Rai, national convenor, Right to Education Forum.

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